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20130101
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the senate's republican minority leader mitch mcconnell. and those contacts continued today. by early this afternoon amid reports of progress, president obama emerged in a campaign style setting. >> today it appears that an agreement to prevent this new year's tax hike is within sight. but it's to the done. there are still issues left to resolve. but we're hopeful that congress can get it done. but
in the fiscal cliff crisis. house republicans agree to meet sunday night to resume talks after a day of finger-pointing and complaining in washington. on wall street, fiscal fears created whiplash for investors: a big stock market sell-off and then bounce back on word that lawmakers are springing back into action. and, if you used your smartphone to shop this christmas, you're in fashion. it was the year's top retail trend. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a dramatic cliff-hanger today between washington and wall street about the fiscal cliff. stocks initially sold off after senate majority leader harry
politicians are running out of time to avoid the budget crisis known as the fiscal cliff. every reed said democrats and republicans had to stop squabbling to have any chance at which an agreement by december 31st and higher taxes and spending cuts will automatically take effect. president obama has cut short his holiday to revive the talks. >> if we go over this cliff, the house of representative with four days left are not here with the speaker having told him that he will have 458 hours' notice. i cannot imagine their conscience out there wherever they are around the country and we are trying to get something done. >> why is the american economy teetering on the edge of the cliffs? these are some of the things that president obama is trying to prevent with the return to the lighthouse. an employment has fallen to a four year low and currently stands at 7.7%. no deal could mean 2.1 million jobs disappearing parent to it would equate to a contraction of 1.5% in the value of all goods and services america producers meaning less money to afraid with the rest of the world. as far as the repu
to have a fiscal cliff recommendation soon. >> we will be working hard to see if we can get there in next 24 hours and so i am hopeful and optimistic. >> reporter: but the sticking point remains finding something that can make it through the house with enough support from republicans. >> it seems like the 250 threshold that the president proposed previously is unlikely to pass the house in its current form, and so without some sort of additional compromise there, it seems unlikely that we're going to get something done before the end of the year. >> susie: you know thanks for that report. i am just wondering from all of the reporting you have done, do you think we are better off with a bad deal than no deal at all? >> you know susie when peopletal they are talking about a bad deal in political terms. frankly it's republicans that are most worried about the bad deal they have most leverage. the president has the most leverage. they are worried about a bad deal. any deal that gets us past the fiscal cliff is going to be seen as a good deal. >> susie: it seems like we are further apart than
. tom hudson will be along a little later in the program. a positive turn in the fiscal cliff crisis. house republicans agree to meet sunday night to resume talks after a day of finger-pointing and complaining in washington. on wall street, fiscal fears created whiplash for investors: a big stock market sell-off and then bounce back on word that lawmakers are springing back into action. and, if you used your smartphone to shop this christmas, you're in fashion. it was the year's top retail trend. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a dramatic cliff-hanger today between washington and wall street about the fiscal cliff. stocks initially sold off after senate majority leader harry
markets again in february. >> the republicans are going to be defeated coming out of this fiscal cliff fight. and i think that they are just not going to go along with raising the debt ceiling unless they get something for it. and if the president is not prepared to give them something, then it's going to be really hard to see a way out of that. >> reporter: if congress does not act before the end of the year, the public's reaction will determine how fast congress moves to fix the damage. >> what forces action after we pass the deadline is the public reaction to it. and so i think the big question is going to be what happens in the real economy, how frustrated are average americans that their paycheck is meaningfully smaller? and if that is a massive reaction, then they'll get a quick response. >> reporter: while u.s. markets have been fairly weak lately, they have not yet registered true alarm at the prospect of deadlock in washington. it seems many investors see the fiscal cliff as a slope that will only gradually impact the economy. but washington analysts believe investors may be u
right enough to get something done on the fiscal cliff. we saw the president this harch meet with the bipartisan leadership in congress. remember the republicans because of the intransigence we talked about their caucus sought the speaker es plan for a plan b. that weakened the republican negotiating position . and now the president has maximum leverage because the tax cuts are due to expire by the end of the year. mitch mcconnell said he was hopeful and optimistic that they could get a deal that they could pass. the reason that that could happen if mitch mcconnell lets it happen, john boehner may feel no option but to put that on the floor for pass adge whether or not most republicans are for it. that would be the realization of that -- >> wouldn't that violate the principle that would have govern the policy that nothing wowlingd pass unless the yort of the majority support it. >> it would violate the principle. some democrats think that mitch mcconnell is ready to force john boehner's hand. we know the republicans are going to lose the fight of taxes because tax rates are g
on new year's eve and they say if we go over the so-called fiscal cliff, take all the tax votes you want, they're all tax cut votes. and conservative republicans believe their bargaining position improves. you reported on the debt limit but that becomes more of a concern as february approaches. they think they have leverage there to come bean the debt limit with the debate over more spending cut and more leverage on what they want from taxes. so there are strong voices on both sides so they say go over. >> warner: we better fasten our seat belts. ed to >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": a ban on adoptions from russia; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the
reductions in we can understand. >> we are upon the fiscal cliff. will we need to focus on is how we find that common ground. ira by -- i believe republicans and democrats alike want to put us on the course to fiscal discipline. >> we are running at a time. americans are threatened with a tax hike in just few hours. i hope we can keep in mind that our single most important goal is to protect middle-class families. >> democrats and republicans in congress have to get this done but they are not there yet. they are closed but not there yet. one thing we can count on with respect to this congress is that if there is even one second left, they will lose -- they will use that last second. >> the gap between the two sides is narrowing. time is running short. if a deal cannot be found, the eventual impact on americans will be severe. over the year, the average family would pay an extra $2,000 in tax. there would be sharp cuts in spending across government operations. defense would be hit hard. with so much money coming out of the economy, america would face higher unemployment and probably effect
of the fiscal cliff. if we do go over the cliff, the i.r.s. has warned most taxpayers may not be able to file their returns until late march. that would mean long delays for many tax refunds. and economists warn the economic effects will be felt quickly if $600 billion in automatic tax increases and spending cuts begin to take effect next year. at this rate, it looks like lawmakers will celebrate new year's eve at work-- if not resolving the fiscal cliff, at least trying to avoid the blame. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: going over the fiscal cliff will not only have an impact on the national level, it will also hit states and eventually cities. if lawmakers fail to reach a deal before january 1, the cliff's across the board spending cuts and tax increases will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the
on the senate to come up with a plan to avert the fiscal cliff. with prospects still murky for a deal before year's end, what can government workers, wall street investors and taxpayers expect if lawmakers miss the deadline? for that, we turn to stacy palmer, editor of the chronicle of philanthropy. jackie simon, public policy director of the american federation of government employees. and hugh johnson, who runs an investment and advisory firm in albany, new york. you all represent different constituencies. i want to start with you, jackie. -- sorry, i want to start with you, stacy, and talk about philanthropy. this is the end of the year when people are making their decisions about whether they're going to get tax breaks or who they're going to give to. are people looking at the fiscal cliff and saying "i don't know"? >> absolutely. people are uncertain as to whether there's going to be a charitable deduction next year, things like the estate tax will change. so it's a rocky time. so some people are giving more and deciding "i'm going to get the tax break now and do it while it's a good th
before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their first group meeting with the president since november 16th. vice president biden and treasury secretary timothy geithner also attend. but there was little to suggest the makings of an 11th hour bargain. a source familiar with the meeting told the newshour its president is sticking with his offer from last friday. it included keeping the bush era tax break force the middle class but raising tax rates on incomes over 250,000 dollars a year. president also wants to extend unemployment benefits for some 2 million americans who will lose them in the new year. and a proposal would delay any spending cuts. the president asked for an up or down vote on his plan unless there is a counter proposal that will pass both the house and senate. a little more than an hour after the meeting began, several pa
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)